New Study Finds Hydration Levels Affect Cardiovascular Health

Stavros Kavouras, associate professor, Department of Health, Human Performance and Recreation
Photo Submitted

Stavros Kavouras, associate professor, Department of Health, Human Performance and Recreation

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. – Mild dehydration can impair vascular function nearly as much as smoking a cigarette, according to a new study in the European Journal of Nutrition.

This study indicates that hydration levels – even mild dehydration in healthy, young males – play a role in the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Stavros Kavouras, associate professor and coordinator of the Exercise Science Program at the University of Arkansas, led the international team that published the study.

“You could be mildly dehydrated without knowing it while you have endothelial impairment similar to smoking a cigarette,” Kavouras said. “The degree of dehydration when these changes occur is at less than 2 percent dehydration, which is around the threshold when people start feeling thirsty.”

Endothelial function is the dilation and constriction of the endothelium, the inner lining of blood vessels. It plays a critical role in cardiovascular health. Atherosclerosis is the loss of flexibility in the blood vessels that leads to hardening of the arteries, a known contributor to cardiovascular disease.

This study is the first to find a connection between minor dehydration and negative endothelial function with impaired cardiovascular health in humans.

Kavouras and his team noted that the next step for the research team is to study this effect on patients of both genders with already compromised cardiovascular systems, such as patients of diabetes and/or cardiovascular diseases.

About the University of Arkansas: The University of Arkansas provides an internationally competitive education for undergraduate and graduate students in more than 200 academic programs. The university contributes new knowledge, economic development, basic and applied research, and creative activity while also providing service to academic and professional disciplines. The Carnegie Foundation classifies the University of Arkansas among only 2 percent of universities in America that have the highest level of research activity. U.S. News & World Report ranks the University of Arkansas among its top American public research universities. Founded in 1871, the University of Arkansas comprises 10 colleges and schools and maintains a low student-to-faculty ratio that promotes personal attention and close mentoring.

Contacts

Stavros Kavouras, associate professor, Department of Health, Human Performance and Recreation
College of Education and Health Professions
479-575-5309, kavouras@uark.edu

Amy Schlesing, director of science and research communications
University Relations
479-575-3033, amys@uark.edu

Headlines

Founder and CEO of Girls Who Code to Give Distinguished Lecture

Reshma Saujani, founder and CEO of Girls Who Code, will speak as part of the U of A Distinguished Lecture Series on Wednesday, Dec. 4, at the Fayetteville Town Center.

Bumpers College Agricultural Systems Technology Program Utilizing Robot Donated by Tyson Foods

Don Johnson, agricultural systems professor, said the robot will be used in existing classes, as well as an upcoming special topics class on agricultural industrial robotics.

Bumpers College Honors Students Publish Service Learning Research

Undergraduate theses by Sarah Beth DeLay, Mersady Redding and Kelsey Johnson were published by an international undergraduate journal.

Annual HBG Design Competition Recognizes Work by Three Fay Jones School Students

Urbano Soto, Bryan Murren and James Hull were honored in the 12th annual HBG Design International Design Competition during an Oct. 30 awards ceremony in Vol Walker Hall.

SOOIE Announces "Of the Month" Winners

SOOIE announced Megan Rodgers, Yassaman Mirdamadi and the Suture Clinic, hosted by Alpha Epsilon Delta as the recipients of the "Of the Month" awards.

Newswire Daily