Razorback Transit Passengers Required to Wear Face Coverings

Razorback Transit

As a part of the University of Arkansas' phased return to on-campus operations, Razorback Transit passengers will be required to wear face coverings beginning Monday, June 15.

This requirement is being put in place as a precautionary measure to help protect all passengers from the spread of COVID-19. The June 15 start date coincides with the beginning of the first phase of the university's guide to Returning to Campus

Wearing a face covering is required on campus when appropriate social distancing can not be maintained. Social distancing is also required along with frequent hand washing, and regular cleaning and sanitation efforts.

The U of A is following the guidance of the governor's office, the Arkansas Department of Health, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Razorback Transit operates in compliance with federal guidelines as outlined in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and will honor reasonable and timely requests for modifications and accommodations. Click here for more details. 

Contacts

David Wilson, communications director
Transit and Parking
479-575-6089, dbw010@uark.edu

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