Egyptian Novelist and Professor to Read from her Award-Winning Novel

Reem Bassiouney, the award-winning Egyptian author of The Pistachio Seller, will present two readings from her novel on Thursday, Dec. 2. The first reading and discussion of her novel will be in Kimpel Hall, room 305 at 3:30 p.m. A second reading will begin at 7 p.m. at Nightbird Books on Dickson St. Both events are free and the public is welcome.

The readings are being sponsored by the university’s King Fahd Center for Middle East and Islamic Studies.

Bassiouney is associate professor of Arabic linguistics at Georgetown University and author of several novels as well as scholarly non-fiction, such as the recently published Arabic Sociolinguistics.

The Pistachio Seller, translated by Osman Nusair, won the 2009 Arabic translation award from the King Faud Center.

Contacts

Laila Taraghi, instructor
The King Fahd Center for Middle East and Islamic S
479-575-2157, ltaraghi@uark.edu

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